Why Christian leaders put aside differences to push immigration reform

Cardinal Sean O'Malley leads mass along the international border wall in Nogales, Ariz., earlier this month. 

Matt York/AP/FileCardinal Sean O'Malley leads mass along the international border wall in Nogales, Ariz., earlier this month. Matt York/AP/File

Two weeks ago, the Rev. Luis Cortés stood outside the White House after he and other faith leaders came to town to talk about immigration reform.

Tuesday morning, the same scene will play out on Capitol Hill, as over 250 evangelical pastors from 25 states meet with their members of Congress to urge them to take action on immigration reform.

With House Republicans safe in their seats and Senate Republicans in line to make gains this fall, the chances for any movement on immigration reform before the midterm elections looks dim. But religious leaders around the country don’t appear willing to take “no” for an answer.

Though various denominations often don’t see eye to eye on contentious social matters such as same-sex marriage and abortion, legislation to overhaul the nation’s immigration system has overwhelmingly drawn them together.

“It is the first and only political issue in this country where we all agree,” Mr. Cortés told reporters on April 15.

Via The Christian Science Monitor

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